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Archive: 2018 / 02

Happy Birthday George Washington!

On February 22nd 1732 George Washington was born at Pope’s Creek. Today he would have been 286 years old! If you are interested in learning more about George and his English Ancestors we are opening from 1st April until September, on Thursday, Fridays and Sundays from 11 to 5pm!

On February 22nd 1732 George Washington was born at Pope’s Creek. Today he would have been 286 years old! If you are interested in learning more about George and his English Ancestors we are opening from 1st April until September, on Thursday, Fridays and Sundays from 11 to 5pm!


Brand New Visitor Experience!

With the New Year Sulgrave Manor has seen a brand new update to its visitor experience. From the 1st April 2018, Visitors will be able to explore the Manor house on an hands on self-led journey. Self-led visits allow you to go at your own pace, dip in and out of history and savour the many stories Sulgrave has to offer.

Our Operations Manager, Carla Cooper said, ‘we are always looking to new ways to attract visitors to Sulgrave and we feel that being able to enjoy the house and garden more freely will appeal to a wider range of visitor, especially families…..

Visitors can learn about the characters who lived and worked in the house and rise and fall of the Manor ….did you know that Sulgrave Manor once stood empty and was used by a notorious local gang? The new experience takes you on an exciting journey from prestigious Tudor Manor house to its purchase by the American Peace Committee in 1914. With new trails and child-friendly character trails, families can enjoy learning together and exploring the grounds. To still keep that special touch, our knowledgeable stewards will also be on site to further explain the rich history and make sure you have the best day possible. Where possible, guided tours will also be available depending on demand.

With the New Year Sulgrave Manor has seen a brand new update to its visitor experience. From the 1st April 2018, Visitors will be able to explore the Manor house on an hands on self-led journey. Self-led visits allow you to go at your own pace, dip in and out of history and savour the many stories Sulgrave has to offer.

Our Operations Manager, Carla Cooper said, ‘we are always looking to new ways to attract visitors to Sulgrave and we feel that being able to enjoy the house and garden more freely will appeal to a wider range of visitor, especially families…..

Visitors can learn about the characters who lived and worked in the house and rise and fall of the Manor ….did you know that Sulgrave Manor once stood empty and was used by a notorious local gang? The new experience takes you on an exciting journey from prestigious Tudor Manor house to its purchase by the American Peace Committee in 1914. With new trails and child-friendly character trails, families can enjoy learning together and exploring the grounds. To still keep that special touch, our knowledgeable stewards will also be on site to further explain the rich history and make sure you have the best day possible. Where possible, guided tours will also be available depending on demand.


Sulgrave in Art

Sometimes the best views of the Manor have been through art. Daniel Sherrin painted this view of the Manor in 1910 for Thos Murphy’s ‘In Unfamiliar England’.

Murphy wrote “Very faithful in detail and sentiment is Mr Sherrin’s picture, painted at my request—the artist gaining his inspiration by a week under the old roof while employed in his task. The picture shows the old house much as we saw it, standing against a rich sunset sky, its harsh outlines softened by a little distance.” (p. 43)

Sometimes the best views of the Manor have been through art. Daniel Sherrin painted this view of the Manor in 1910 for Thos Murphy’s ‘In Unfamiliar England’.

Murphy wrote “Very faithful in detail and sentiment is Mr Sherrin’s picture, painted at my request—the artist gaining his inspiration by a week under the old roof while employed in his task. The picture shows the old house much as we saw it, standing against a rich sunset sky, its harsh outlines softened by a little distance.” (p. 43)